steamworks4j

A thin Java wrapper for the Steamworks C++ API.

About
Getting started
Build instructions
Known issues
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View the Project on GitHub code-disaster/steamworks4j

Getting started

Project setup

To add Steamworks support, you just have to download and add the appropriate JAR files to your Java project.

Release versions

Major updates are released on Maven Central, so the easiest way is to add the library as an external dependency, using your favorite build environment.

Maven:

<dependencies>
  <dependency>
    <groupId>com.code-disaster.steamworks4j</groupId>
    <artifactId>steamworks4j</artifactId>
    <version>1.8.0</version>
  </dependency>
  <dependency>
    <groupId>com.code-disaster.steamworks4j</groupId>
    <artifactId>steamworks4j-server</artifactId>
    <version>1.8.0</version>
  </dependency>
</dependencies>

Gradle:

dependencies {
  compile "com.code-disaster.steamworks4j:steamworks4j:1.8.0"
  compile "com.code-disaster.steamworks4j:steamworks4j-server:1.8.0"
}

If you don’t use any build tools, direct downloads of .jar files are also available.

Snapshot versions

I’ve started releasing snapshot builds on Sonatype.

Maven:

<repositories>
  <repository>
    <url>https://oss.sonatype.org/content/repositories/snapshots</url>
    <snapshots>
      <enabled>true</enabled>
    </snapshots>
  </repository>
</repositories>

<dependencies>
  <dependency>
    <groupId>com.code-disaster.steamworks4j</groupId>
    <artifactId>steamworks4j</artifactId>
    <version>1.8.1-SNAPSHOT</version>
  </dependency>
  <dependency>
    <groupId>com.code-disaster.steamworks4j</groupId>
    <artifactId>steamworks4j-server</artifactId>
    <version>1.8.1-SNAPSHOT</version>
  </dependency>
</dependencies>

Gradle:

repositories {
    maven {
        url "https://oss.sonatype.org/content/repositories/snapshots/"
    }
}

dependencies {
  compile "com.code-disaster.steamworks4j:steamworks4j:1.8.1-SNAPSHOT"
  compile "com.code-disaster.steamworks4j:steamworks4j-server:1.8.1-SNAPSHOT"
}

Build from source

To learn how to build the library from source code, please refer to the build instructions.

Basic usage

Preparation

You’ll notice that the library source code is documented very scarcely. That’s a deliberate choice. I assume that you are a registered Steam developer and have access to the Steamworks documentation as your primary source of information.

Please refer to the official documentation to learn about the steps needed to prepare your application for use with Steam. Here’s a very brief checklist:

Initialization

As a first step, to load the native libraries, you need to call SteamAPI.loadLibraries().

Second, to initialize the Steamworks client API, you call SteamAPI.init().

Before steamworks4j v1.8.0, both these steps were condensed in SteamAPI.init(). This has been changed to allow applications to call certain functions, like SteamAPI.restartAppIfNecessary(), before the Steam API is initialized.

try {
    SteamAPI.loadLibraries();
    if (!SteamAPI.init()) {
        // Steamworks initialization error, e.g. Steam client not running
    }
} catch (SteamException e) {
    // Error extracting or loading native libraries
}

By default, SteamAPI.loadLibraries() detects the operating system it runs on, then extracts the appropriate native libraries from your application’s resource path to a temporary folder. There’s a second function which allows to specify the path to a directory containing the native libraries.

SteamAPI.loadLibraries("./libs");

Update ticks

Add a call to SteamAPI.runCallbacks() to your game loop. Steamworks recommends it to be called at least 15 times per second, but I haven’t seen any performance impact if e.g. called each frame at 60 fps.

if (SteamAPI.isSteamRunning()) {
    SteamAPI.runCallbacks();
}

Creating interfaces

The steamworks4j library follows the Steamworks C++ API as close as feasible. In general, for each interface exposed by the C++ API, there’s an equivalent Java class (if implemented). For example, the SteamUserStats Java class provides access to the ISteamUserStats C++ API.

At present, not all interfaces are implemented by the Java library. Some of those which are, do not expose the full API. In general, I’ve added everything I needed for our own games, plus what I’ve been asked to. Feel free to send feature requests, or even better, pull requests on Github to add the functions and interfaces still missing.

If a C++ interface contains functions which trigger STEAM_CALLBACK() or CCallResult<> style callbacks (say, most of them), the Java class is accompanied by a callback interface which must be implemented by the user application.

It is only guaranteed that, at any time, each instance of an interface does only receive callbacks related to its latest respective API call.

In practice this means that the application shouldn’t “batch-execute” the same API function, then wait for a bunch of callbacks. Instead, only one single API call should be issued. Then the application should wait for the callback, process it, then execute the next API call.

If you really want to execute more of the same callback-triggering function in parallel, you have to create and maintain multiple instances of that interface.

public class MyAppUserStatsCallback
        implements SteamUserStatsCallback {

    // ... application-specific implementation
}

SteamUserStatsCallback callback = new MyAppUserStatsCallback();
SteamUserStats stats = new SteamUserStats(callback);

Shutdown

Each interface instance (each instance of a class derived from SteamInterface) allocates and owns at least a few bytes of native heap memory. You should call SteamInterface.dispose() on shutdown to prevent memory leaks.

stats.dispose();

To shut down the Steamworks API, just call SteamAPI.shutdown(). This may flush (sync) any pending client data, e.g. achievements and user stats, so you should make sure your application exists gracefully.

SteamAPI.shutdown();

The steamworks4j-server module

With steamworks4j v1.7.0, server functions were moved to a separate Maven module, steamworks4j-server.

GameServer API

Basic API use is similar to the client wrapper, just with SteamGameServerAPI as the main entry point.

// initialization
try {
    SteamGameServerAPI.loadLibraries();
    if (!SteamGameServerAPI.init((127 << 24) + 1, (short) 27015, (short) 27016, (short) 27017,
        SteamGameServerAPI.ServerMode.NoAuthentication, "0.0.1"))) {
        // initialization error
    }
} catch (SteamException e) {
    // Error extracting or loading native libraries
}

// update ticks
while (serverIsAlive) {
  SteamGameServerAPI.runCallbacks();
}

// shutdown
SteamGameServerAPI.shutdown();

Encrypted app tickets

The SteamEncryptedAppTicket wrapper is embedded inside the server module, but works as a stand-alone since it only depends on the sdkencryptedappticket shared library. Its use is simple - you just need to ensure that the native library is loaded first.

try {
    SteamEncryptedAppTicket.loadLibraries();
} catch (SteamException e) {
    // Error extracting or loading native libraries
}

SteamEncryptedAppTicket encryptedAppTicket = new SteamEncryptedAppTicket();

Sample applications

The steamworks-tests module contains some console applications which demonstrate use of the Java API and some of its interfaces.